PHNTX Physician Awarded Prestigious FIDSA Designation

1 MIN READ | Author: Tri Truong

Prism Health North Texas is proud to share that Dr. Jason Gillman MD, Physician at the Oak Cliff Center and Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO), has been elected as a Fellow of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) by the IDSA.

The IDSA is the nation’s leading infectious diseases (ID) professional society. Each year, a group of distinguished physicians and scientists from around the world are elected to be Fellows of IDSA. The designation is particularly impactful this year as ID physicians across the globe battle the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Infectious diseases specialists have trained their entire careers to step up to the plate during a crisis such as the one we face today with the COVID-19 pandemic,” said IDSA President Barbara Alexander, MD, MHS, FIDSA in a release. “ID physicians and scientists are working on the front lines of every aspect of this outbreak, from treating patients to developing and studying diagnostics and therapies to working on vaccines. They are also preparing for the next outbreak and protecting individual and public health.”

Dr. Gillman has worked diligently on the PHNTX team since 2014, with a focus on treating HIV and related infections. He is also serving as an investigator on several clinical research trials, including the AstraZeneca Oxford COVID-19 vaccine trial currently being facilitated at PHNTX’s Oak Cliff Center.

“When I completed my Infectious Disease fellowship in 2013, I never imagined working through a pandemic with the level of global impact we are seeing today,” Dr. Gillman said. “Reflecting on my career so far, I think the core value in our field lies in the recognition that a new infection can emerge at any time, and often with little warning.”

Dr. Gillman is the first PHNTX physician to be elected as a Fellow of the IDSA.

“For me, election as a Fellow of IDSA means a life-long commitment to respond to these unexpected challenges, and I hope it is something I can live up to,” Dr. Gillman added.